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Case Scenario for Human & Drug Trafficking

[Note: The following is based on a real case. The names and identifying information have been changed.]

Sally was arrested for prostitution after agreeing to have sex for money with an undercover police officer. She claimed to be the victim of human trafficking. Here is the story she told.

She had been looking for a job in her home town, a small village, because she needed the income to help support her family. Her father had died several years previously, and her mother’s income was not enough to support her and her younger brother and sister.

She met John Jones at Andrew’s Bar and Grill. In conversation, she mentioned that she was looking for a job. Jones said that he had been looking for several people to serve as waitresses. Jones gave her a business card, and told her to phone him to discuss it further.

She telephoned Jones and agreed to meet him at the Coburn Restaurant. She met him there, and they discussed a job in a restaurant and bar. He told her that to get the job, she would need to relocate to a major city. He said that he would arrange and pay for her travel there. They agreed that she would work as a cocktail waitress, working evenings in the bar at the Dahlia Restaurant. They agreed on her pay and a work schedule.

When she arrived in the major city, Jones met Sally at the airport. He took her to the Eagle Hotel, where he said he had arranged for her stay temporarily. He carried her bags up to her room.

When they arrived at her room, he told her, “This isn’t a free ride. You’re going to have to earn your keep.” He then pulled out a pistol. He beat Sally with a baseball bat and forced her to drink a glass of vodka and take two blue pills that made her disoriented and confused. He then raped her.

Jones told her that she would be working for him as a prostitute and if she tried to escape, her family would be killed. Her first trick occurred that same evening in the same hotel room with a man well-known to Jones, whom he introduced as “Jack.”

Sally began working regularly as a prostitute for Jones.
Jones introduced her to Sam Smith, who also worked for Jones. Smith sometimes met with Sally when Jones was otherwise engaged. Sally recounted details of several meetings with Smith, which, for the sake of brevity, are not repeated here.

After several months, Sally was arrested and told her story to the police.
The police arrested Jones and Smith. Jones admitted being involved with Sally and her prostitution, but said that she worked voluntarily. Smith said that this was a case of mistaken identity, and he did not know Sally.

Here is the story that Jones told. He met Sally at Andrew’s Bar and Grill. They talked and exchanged phone numbers. 
Later he phoned her, and they agreed to meet at the Galton Bar. They met there and had a few drinks. Then they went to the Chelsea Hotel. They went up to a hotel room. After smoking marijuana in the hotel room, they had consensual sex. The next morning he told her that he could provide her with a very lucrative job in the major city if she was willing to do more of the same thing. He said, “Why work for peanuts?  A girl like you can have a life of luxury and get your kicks at the same time.” She agreed to come to the city. 

When Sally arrived in the city, Jones said he met her at the airport. He bought her dinner at the Fox Restaurant. They drank champagne to celebrate her arrival. Then they went to the Hiram Hotel, where they had consensual sex. 
Jones said that Sally worked voluntarily as a prostitute for several months until she was arrested.
Jones said he was aware of her activities as a prostitute, but he did not engage in any criminal activity himself. His only involvement was to see her socially, to introduce her to people he knew, and to help her with her finances, lodging and other challenges for a new girl in a big city.

In this case, Brain Fingerprinting can be applied to detect the presence or absence of concealed information in the brains of all three individuals involved: Jones, Sally, and Smith.
If Sally’s story is true and Jones’s story is false, then Jones will have experienced the events described in the following information. If Jones’s story is true and Sally’s story is false, then Jones will not know the following information, because the alleged events did not occur. 

  • They met in the Coburn Restaurant to discuss a job for Sally.
  • The job they agreed upon was a cocktail waitress.
  • They agreed that she was to work at the Dahlia Restaurant.
  • When she arrived in the city, they went to the Eagle Hotel.
  • He said, “This isn’t a free ride. You’ll have to earn your keep.”
  • He beat her with a baseball bat.
  • He forced her to drink vodka.
  • He forced her to take two blue pills.
  • Her first trick that same night was “Jack.”

Brain Fingerprinting can be applied to determine scientifically and accurately whether or not this information is stored in Jones’s brain.

If Jones’s story is true and Sally’s story is false, then Sally will have experienced the events described in the following information. If Sally’s story is true and Jones’ story is false, then Sally will not know the following information, because the alleged events did not occur. 

  • After their initial meeting, they got in touch by phone and then met for drinks at the Galton Bar.
  • They then went to the Chelsea Hotel where they had sex.
  • There the drug they used was marijuana.
  • He said, “Why work for peanuts?”
  • When she arrived in the city, they had dinner at the Fox Restaurant.
  • There they drank champagne to celebrate her arrival.
  • They then went to the Hiram Hotel where they had sex.

Brain Fingerprinting can be applied to determine scientifically and accurately whether or not this information is stored in Sally’s brain.

Smith claims not to know Sally and never to have met her. If his story is true, then he will not recognize a photograph of Sally and will not know any of the salient features of the various meetings with him that she reported.

Brainwave Science

Brain Fingerprinting scientifically detects whether specific information is stored in the brain - or not - by measuring brainwaves.

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