Mali Attacks: Brain Fingerprinting to Deter and Detect Future Terror

November 20, 2015 | Brainwave Science

Mali Attacks: Brain Fingerprinting to Deter and Detect Future Terror
November 20, 2015 | Brainwave Science

SITUATION
When two gunmen went on a rampage at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Mali’s capital, Bamako, Friday morning and shooting indiscriminately for hours, killed 27 people. It brought swift and unanimous condemnations from President Obama, as well as Francois Hollande, Vladimar V. Putin, and Xi Jinping. Al Qaeda’s (in the Islamic Maghreb or AQIM) decision to target the heart of West Africa’s engagement with the rest of the world as well as the victims of the heinous attack (three Chinese railway executives, six Russian employees, an American development consultant, and a Belgian parliamentary official, as well as citizens of Israel, Mali, and Senegal) represents a snapshot of who has stakes in the region’s fight against terrorism. Just a week after the ISIS-led Paris attacks, this type of assault whereby a small group of militants armed with AK-47s and grenades and ready to die, is materializing itself as the universal operandi of terrorism.
“Today, we see a changed world,” said Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita. “In this situation, the population is our first line of defense. We, the government, can only do so much.” President Keita’s remarks shed light on the current limitations of security against the dynamic threat of terrorism. Like their European counterparts, West African governments are struggling to deal with the threat posed by jihadist groups. Mali is no stranger to jihadist militancy, but there has been no other attack that has ever hit so directly at the country’s power center.
CHALLENGE
The easy availability of assault weapons in Mali means that “as long as there are people willing to go on suicide missions,” the security analyst said, “this type of attack will be difficult to stop.” In addition to the problem of arms proliferation in the region, the Mali attacks symbolizes the dire call for governments to share intelligence and to adopt the right intelligence gathering techniques and modes of interrogation. Whether there were profiles of the two attackers, Abdel Hakim al-Ansari and Moadh al-Ansari, prior to the crisis is unknown; however, with Brain Fingerprinting, valuable information can be collected about the Islamist militant group members, Al Mourabitoun, who is responsible for the attack, to be able to deter future terror. The powerful asset of Brain Fingerprinting is the ability to safely and non-invasively determine with over 99% accuracy, whether there is specific information stored in the suspect’s brain related to a criminal event or situation. Brain Fingerprinting measures brainwave responses to terrorism-relevant or crime-relevant words or pictures presented on a computer screen, or information characteristic of people with specific training or expertise such as the ability to use AK-47s or specific knowledge of terrorist affiliations, such as Al Mourabitoun’s leader, Mokhtar Belmokhtar.
Though two men were the only attackers, whom died during the attack, officials suggest there could have been as many as ten gunmen involved in the attack on the hotel. Authorities cannot objectively identify what privileged knowledge the suspects may be concealing given the current systems of biometric devices and interrogation processes.
WHY BRAIN FINGERPRINTING
Brain Fingerprinting can significantly aid in the investigation of the three suspects who may have been involved in the attack, by verifying whether these suspects have specific information on the Radisson Blu Hotel, strategic plans of the terrorist organization’s activities across Northern Mali, communication networks unique to Al Mourabitoun, and specific channels in which Al Mourabitoun sources their revenue stream such as ransom money from kidnapping and drug trafficking. The type of incriminating information from those who planned the attack, can be drawn safely and non-invasively through Brain Fingerprinting, as it directly targets the brain as the primary mode of analysis.
Benin’s President Thomas Boni Yayi and Burkina Faso’s Prime Minister Yacouba Isaac Zida both visited Mali on Monday to express their condolences, noting solemnly, “Our countries need to get organized. On a regional level, we need reforms,” adding that governments need to consider the “reinforcement of our intelligence capacities and border management.” Brain Fingerprinting empowers law enforcement agencies who are in international solidarity against terrorism, through improving and transforming the way security is conducted at present, to ensure the proper means of weeding out terrorist threats and to prevent deadly attacks across the globe.