Terrorists strike in Nigeria again, Boko Haram attacks force more than 1 million children from school in northeastern Nigeria

December 23, 2015 | Brainwave Science

Terrorists strike in Nigeria again, Boko Haram attacks force more than 1 million children from school in northeastern Nigeria
December 23, 2015 | Brainwave Science

SITUATION
Boko Haram’s six-year insurgency has devastated north-eastern Nigeria, and has spread to Cameroon, Chad and Niger. Nigeria has been ranked third of the 162 countries of the world that have been worst hit by terrorist attacks, according to the 2015 Global Terrorism Index. Nigeria is Africa’s largest oil producer, was ranked fourth in 2014. Going by the latest ranking, Nigeria is only better than two largely Islamic countries – Iraq and Afghanistan – who were ranked first and second respectively. Pakistan and Syria are ranked fourth and fifth to complete the top five most terrorized countries.
More than 2,000 schools were shut, while hundreds had been attacked, looted or set ablaze, Unicef said. Nigeria’s president, Muhammadu Buhari, has given his military commanders until the end of December to end the Boko Haram insurgency, but even if victory is possible analysts say his government will have to contend with social turmoil stemming from a generation of children who have not gone to class.
CHALLENGE
While Boko Haram has used roadside bombs and suicide attacks for years, Gen. David Rodriguez, head of U.S. Africa Command said the U.S. has seen the organization adopt tactics honed by Islamic State fighters in the Middle East. “They have obviously pledged their allegiance [to Islamic State],” Gen. Rodriguez said. “Some of the evolving tactics, techniques and procedures of Boko Haram have now started to mirror some of those things. So we continue to watch that.” In addition to increasing training on how to spot and defuse improvised bombs, the U.S. has stepped up efforts to help partner nations build their own intelligence networks among the local population.
“We are trying to change and stay ahead of the adjustments of the enemy. The training has evolved,” Gen. Rodriguez said. As a result of the shifting tactics by Boko Haram, the U.S. is trying to adjust the training it provides the African militaries fighting the group, Gen. Rodriguez said.
WHY BRAIN FINGERPRINTING
Brain Fingerprinting can easily detect terrorist knowledge and threats – even being able to detect if a suspect has been in a sleeper cell. This is accomplished by searching for knowledge of bomb and IED making and terrorist training activities, both of which are the preferred methods of attack by Boko Haram. It can help reverse engineer a terrorist network and help dismantle the whole organization not just a sole capture of a suspected individual by means of humane investigation. In counterterrorism, there is no comparable technology available that can help catch terrorists throughout the world. Brain Fingerprinting can identify active or inactive terrorists before and after any terrorist act happens. This innovative science aims to save lives and protect countries through its patented technology. Brain Fingerprinting embraces one commonsense premise: even if there is no external evidence left behind, the brain is an infallible witness to the plotting of a crime or terror act. Put another way, the terrorist’s brain contains knowledge of organizations, training, and plans that do not exist in an innocent person’s memory bank.
While Boko Haram terrorists are trying to adjust strategies to combat security forces and avoid arrest, Brain Fingerprinting can be a powerful tool along with US supported training for Nigerian forces, in countering threat posed by Boko Haram in investigations both before and after a terrorist attack.