Massive drug bust in Mansfield, Ohio : 43 face charges

March 1, 2019 | Brainwave Science

Massive drug bust in Mansfield, Ohio : 43 face charges

SITUATION

In a massive drug bust in Mansfield Ohio, more than 40 people have been indicted in federal court in a drug trafficking bust that included heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine and crack cocaine. The authorities have arrested dozens of persons connected to the drug trafficking ring on Thursday morning, according to the Richland County Sheriff’s Office. Of them, at least 43 people have been indicted in federal court and three dozen people have been charged in state court, officials said. Most of these drugs came from Detroit, Michigan and were sold in Mansfield. All the defendants are from Mansfield or nearby area except for a few who are from Detroit.

In this massive operation on Thursday morning, at least 300 law enforcement officers from different agencies took part. Richland County Sheriff’s officials held a press conference at 11 a.m. along with representatives from federal, state and local jurisdictions to provide information on this operation.

There are two indictments associated with two separate operations.  The first indictment charges 23 people for fentanyl distribution from Detroit since 2016.  20 people are charged in the second indictment for trafficking charges involving heroin, cocaine and meth in Mansfield.

In the first indictment, the conspirators obtained heroin, fentanyl, oxycodone and marijuana from suppliers in Detroit and Mansfield, which they then sold in Mansfield. This took place January 2016 onwards.

One of the persons in the first indictment  is also charged with possessing a firearm in continuance of drug trafficking and being a felon in possession of a firearm. Prosecutors are seeking to forfeit 14 firearms seized as part of the investigation.

In the Second indictment, the defendants conspired together since 2015 to obtain large amounts of heroin, crack cocaine, cocaine and methamphetamine to sell in the Mansfield area, according to the indictment.

The collaborative efforts between local law enforcement and their federal partners has made a significant impact on drug trafficking within the communities of Ohio.

 CHALLENGE

Every day, more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids. Opioid consumption by pregnant women during pregnancy has led us to a stage where every 15 minutes, a baby is born suffering from opioid withdrawal. The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl—is a major crisis which affects public health as well as every taxpayer, for its his or her tax money which is used to treat and rehabilitate the victims.

The government must do everything in its capacity and beyond to eliminate this drug crisis which plagues the country. The obvious issue in this whole national exercise is the ability to process the huge number of arrested traffickers in a cost-efficient, time-efficient and human-resource- efficient manner. A fool-proof intelligence gathering mechanism is needed which can provide results-quickly, find out linkages between suspects, detect knowledge of specific crimes in a reliable and non-invasive manner.

America has been battling drugs, but the trouble seems to be mounting because of an increase in heroin and opioid quantity in the country.

The major challenge for the federal agents is the inability to gain accurate intelligence such as  accurate background, involvement in recent criminal activity, how they managed to obtain such large quantity of contraband, the source of these drugs.

The other concern is that conventional systems such as DNA, fingerprints and interviews used during an investigation are not universally applicable and have proved to be useful to the extent which was expected.

WHY ICOGNATIVE?

The Federal and the concerned state agencies in the US aim to reduce drug abuse and related violent crime. For this the  agencies require accurate intelligence and leads from the arrested suspects or witnesses at an appropriate time. iCognative is a technology developed by Brainwave Science to support investigative agencies all over the world . It is the most advanced technology with an amazing accuracy to provide unprecedented levels of accuracy and reliability in intelligence gathering. It does so by tapping into the brain-a place where crime related information is stored for prolonged periods of time.

iCognative can be the weapon against the rising crime and drug abuse. It is savior of human rights because someone tested by this technology does not go through any torture or coercion. Law enforcement agencies must deploy iCognative technology to serve as a modern and valuable intelligence gathering tool to provide accurate critical intelligence, missing links, whereabouts of other criminals, route of drug smuggling and other vital information necessary for federal agents to investigate. This technology is precise in its results. Moreover, there are no false positives and false negatives. The cutting-edge iCognative test is completed in around 45 minutes and it provides virtually infallible intelligence which no other conventional investigation method such as interrogation, polygraph or fingerprinting can provide. iCognative system records and analyzes the brainwave responses using a proprietary headset to record the brain responses of a suspect when confidential information (stimuli) are flashed on a digital screen. The test is able to determine with over 99% accuracy if the information under question is present in the suspect’s brain or not.

Brainwave Science’s  iCognative is applicable in more than 85% of criminal cases while the conventional investigation tools are helpful in only 1-2% cases. These features prove that iCognative is a technology which is fit to be used by law enforcement agencies around the globe in cases such as this one which involves a bust of a dozen drug traffickers. If the authorities add this technology to their arsenal, then it can greatly help them to reduce costs and time requirements for such cases.

Main Source: WDTN

Image Source: Gannett